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Abatjour

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Why they’re not saying Ma’Khia Bryant’s name: The 16-year-old Black girl could never be the “perfect victim.”

By Fabiola Cineas  May 1, 2021, 8:30am  
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A funeral service is held for 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant at the First Church of God on April 30, 2021 in Columbus, Ohio. Bryant was shot and killed on April 20 by a Columbus police officer answering a domestic dispute call.  

Scott Olson/Getty ImagesAfter watching 15 seconds of police body camera footage last week, viewers of various races and political affiliations had made a decision: 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant was “the aggressor” — the “fat,” “huge,” “knife-wielding attacker” and “maniac” who deserved to be fatally shot by the police on April 20 in Columbus,Ohio. According to these viewers, Nicholas Reardon, the police officer who immediately shot and killed Bryant, who was holding a knife, was justified.

That she was a teenager in the middle of an altercation, in which she was presumed to be defending herself, did not matter.Reardon shot Bryant dead about 20 minutes before a judge announced that a jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd, a killing that catalyzed worldwide protests against police violence. For a moment, those seeking justice for Black life exhaled in relief, knowing that the officer who callously took Floyd’s life would be imprisoned.

But the cries for justice that applied to George Floyd did not ring out as loudly for Bryant. Even after it was discovered that Bryant was living in foster care, that she was in the middle of a fight with older women when police arrived, and that she was allegedly the one who summoned the police for help, people — some of the same people who called for justice in Floyd’s case — used police talking points to justify the four bullets that Reardon unloaded into Bryant’s chest. She was brandishing a knife, many pointed out, which meant the other Black women needed to be protected. Crisis response experts noted, however, that deescalation tactics — like commanding Bryant to drop the weapon, physically getting between the women, or simply communicating with her — could have kept everyone alive. In many recorded encounters between the police and white people carrying weapons, for instance, officers didn’t shoot first or even reach for their guns — they successfully managed to peacefully apprehend the suspect.
 
 

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Ike Bana

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Ma’Khia Bryant was a half second from sticking a knife into her foster sister's ribs. It was a good shoot.

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Bryant’s death has become a debate that questions a child’s actions — and worthiness to live — instead of another example of the racism of policing and the institution’s failure to provide wholesome support, care, and safety for the communities it serves. The insistence that Reardon had no other option than to take Bryant’s life to save others — though he risked everyone’s life in the process — displays the lack of consideration and value that society places on the lives of Black girls and women.

Treva Lindsey, a professor of African American women’s history at Ohio State University, told Vox that there are those who won’t see Bryant as a victim but as someone who brought this on herself. And even for those who do see her as a victim, they’ll still victim-blame, erasing the systemic oppression — including that Black children are far more likely to be in foster care than their white counterparts, and kids in foster care are often exposed to high levels of violence — that brought her to being killed at the hands of the police.

“People will say ‘I’m really sad this whole scenario happened, but had she not had that knife …’ That becomes the ‘but,’ the qualifier, the caveat. And too often we have a caveat when it comes to defending, protecting, and caring for Black girls,” Lindsey said.

The debate over whether police should have shot a child
On the afternoon of April 20, Ma’Khia Bryant reportedly dialed 911. The call was dominated by screams, but the caller said that someone was “trying to stab us” and “put hands” on their grandmother. “We need a police officer here now,” the person said. Body camera footage shows that when officer Reardon exited his vehicle, there were seven people outside of the home.

There was yelling, and a girl could be seen falling to the ground after being attacked by Bryant and kicked by an unidentified man standing nearby. Bryant, holding a knife, then lunged toward a woman dressed in pink who was standing up against a vehicle. Just moments after asking “What’s going on?” Reardon pulled out his gun yelled, “Hey! Hey! Get down! Get down!” (prompting the woman in pink to run away) and fired four shots at Bryant. Bryant immediately slumped to the ground next to the vehicle.

Interim Columbus police chief Michael Woods called the shooting a terrible tragedy for all those involved but said department policy states that an officer can use deadly force against someone when they appear to be inflicting harm on another person. He explained that the officers did not use a taser because there was an immediate threat of death. In addition, the chief said that officers aren’t required to verbalize to bystanders that they are about to fire their weapon.

The Columbus Police Department has long disproportionately used excessive force against Black people, coming under fire in recent months for the police killings of Andre Hill, a Black man police shot in a garage, and Casey Goodson Jr., a Black man who was entering his home.

Almost 55 percent of the department’s use-of-force incidents targeted Black people who make up less than 30 percent of the population. Other reports show how racism is rampant within the department’s ranks. With renewed attention on the department, the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation is conducting a third-party investigation of Bryant’s shooting that will answer questions like what might have happened if Reardon did not shoot and what information he had upon approaching the scene.

Sill, many have already drawn their own conclusions. Bryant’s death sparked debate across media and social media about whether the officer should have shot the 16-year-old.

On Face the Nation, Rep. Val Demings (D-FL), a former Orlando police chief, vehemently defended the officers’ actions, saying that police are forced to make calls in the heat of the moment. “Everybody has the benefit of slowing the video down and seizing the perfect moment. The officer on the street does not have that ability. He or she has to make those split-second decisions, and they’re tough.”


On the popular radio show The Breakfast Club, host DJ Envy stated, “The whole situation is tragic and it’s sad because that system failed that young lady.” But he also added, “Every case is different, and in this case, if I pull up to a scene and see a girl chasing another girl about to stab a girl, my job as a police officer is to make sure that girl doesn’t get killed. And the law allows me to stop that killing or that stabbing by any means necessary.”

But as crisis interventionists pointed out, the police officer could have taken steps to deescalate the situation, savings all lives in the process. Psychologist Merushka Bisetty explained in an essay for Vox that children like Bryant may “present with aggression and an inability to self-regulate their emotions and, consequently, engage in behaviors that can seem aggressive or involve weapons,” but that doesn’t mean that these situations “require or should be met with violent force.” Instead, it’s the role of intervening professionals to stop an aggressive interaction from becoming fatal.

That the reaction to Bryant’s killing has turned into a debate about whether the use of force is justified is an attempt to “displace blame onto the victim and their family rather than on the systems that created situations that led to her death,” Bisetty, who has provided services in shelters, schools, and jails, wrote. “It is worth considering whether Bryant might have still been alive today if a mental health expert — or someone else trained in nonviolent deescalation — had responded to the call.”

It’s also worth considering whether the police officer would have fired shots if Bryant or the people involved in the altercation were white. There are countless examples of police peacefully apprehending white boys and men wielding weapons. Just last year police officers in Kenosha, Wisconsin, handed water bottles to and thanked 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse, a self-described militia member who carried an AR-15-style rifle during the unrest that followed the police shooting of Jacob Blake. Rittenhouse was allowed to leave the scene after fatally shooting two people and harming another, though the police had been informed that he was the shooter.


In other cases, white men have verbally threatened police officers and pointed weapons at them. In those situations, the police did not reach for their guns at all or ever use them. In 2019, 19-year-old Matthew Bernard who killed two women and a child led Virginia authorities, who tried to stop him with mace and a stun gun, on a naked chase before they eventually took him into custody.


White women, too, often get a softer side of law enforcement handling. Several white women who were part of the Capitol insurrection on January 6 could be seen on video being peacefully escorted down the steps of the Capitol building amid the chaos. In a tense July 2020 Detroit-area encounter, a white woman in a minivan pointed a gun at a Black mother while the Black woman’s 15-year-old daughter watched and screamed nearby. When the police arrived after six 911 calls, they ordered the white woman out of the van, put her on the ground, handcuffed her, and took her gun, according to the police.


Black women aren’t treated with the same patriarchal protections, however problematic, that are afforded to white women, Lindsey points out. The idea that Black women should be handled with care because they are women just doesn’t exist.

“We see an incredibly disparate treatment gap between what white women experience with police and what Black women experience with police,” she said.

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Taipan

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Andrew Brown, Jr. was buried today.
He is the new hero of the black-power, "hate the White cops" movement.
Brown was a heavy duty drug dealer who was shot to death while resisting
arrest for the crimes that he chose to commit.

Blacks commit 80% of the crime in this country.
Why do you support their ugliness ?


 

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Roll Out
Abatjour » 03 May 2021, 7:59 pm » wrote: Bryant’s death has become a debate that questions a child’s actions — and worthiness to live — instead of another example of the racism of policing and the institution’s failure to provide wholesome support, care, and safety for the communities it serves. The insistence that Reardon had no other option than to take Bryant’s life to save others — though he risked everyone’s life in the process — displays the lack of consideration and value that society places on the lives of Black girls and women.

Treva Lindsey, a professor of African American women’s history at Ohio State University, told Vox that there are those who won’t see Bryant as a victim but as someone who brought this on herself. And even for those who do see her as a victim, they’ll still victim-blame, erasing the systemic oppression — including that Black children are far more likely to be in foster care than their white counterparts, and kids in foster care are often exposed to high levels of violence — that brought her to being killed at the hands of the police.

“People will say ‘I’m really sad this whole scenario happened, but had she not had that knife …’ That becomes the ‘but,’ the qualifier, the caveat. And too often we have a caveat when it comes to defending, protecting, and caring for Black girls,” Lindsey said.

The debate over whether police should have shot a child
On the afternoon of April 20, Ma’Khia Bryant reportedly dialed 911. The call was dominated by screams, but the caller said that someone was “trying to stab us” and “put hands” on their grandmother. “We need a police officer here now,” the person said. Body camera footage shows that when officer Reardon exited his vehicle, there were seven people outside of the home.

There was yelling, and a girl could be seen falling to the ground after being attacked by Bryant and kicked by an unidentified man standing nearby. Bryant, holding a knife, then lunged toward a woman dressed in pink who was standing up against a vehicle. Just moments after asking “What’s going on?” Reardon pulled out his gun yelled, “Hey! Hey! Get down! Get down!” (prompting the woman in pink to run away) and fired four shots at Bryant. Bryant immediately slumped to the ground next to the vehicle.

Interim Columbus police chief Michael Woods called the shooting a terrible tragedy for all those involved but said department policy states that an officer can use deadly force against someone when they appear to be inflicting harm on another person. He explained that the officers did not use a taser because there was an immediate threat of death. In addition, the chief said that officers aren’t required to verbalize to bystanders that they are about to fire their weapon.

The Columbus Police Department has long disproportionately used excessive force against Black people, coming under fire in recent months for the police killings of Andre Hill, a Black man police shot in a garage, and Casey Goodson Jr., a Black man who was entering his home.

Almost 55 percent of the department’s use-of-force incidents targeted Black people who make up less than 30 percent of the population. Other reports show how racism is rampant within the department’s ranks. With renewed attention on the department, the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation is conducting a third-party investigation of Bryant’s shooting that will answer questions like what might have happened if Reardon did not shoot and what information he had upon approaching the scene.

Sill, many have already drawn their own conclusions. Bryant’s death sparked debate across media and social media about whether the officer should have shot the 16-year-old.

On Face the Nation, Rep. Val Demings (D-FL), a former Orlando police chief, vehemently defended the officers’ actions, saying that police are forced to make calls in the heat of the moment. “Everybody has the benefit of slowing the video down and seizing the perfect moment. The officer on the street does not have that ability. He or she has to make those split-second decisions, and they’re tough.”

On the popular radio show The Breakfast Club, host DJ Envy stated, “The whole situation is tragic and it’s sad because that system failed that young lady.” But he also added, “Every case is different, and in this case, if I pull up to a scene and see a girl chasing another girl about to stab a girl, my job as a police officer is to make sure that girl doesn’t get killed. And the law allows me to stop that killing or that stabbing by any means necessary.”

But as crisis interventionists pointed out, the police officer could have taken steps to deescalate the situation, savings all lives in the process. Psychologist Merushka Bisetty explained in an essay for Vox that children like Bryant may “present with aggression and an inability to self-regulate their emotions and, consequently, engage in behaviors that can seem aggressive or involve weapons,” but that doesn’t mean that these situations “require or should be met with violent force.” Instead, it’s the role of intervening professionals to stop an aggressive interaction from becoming fatal.

That the reaction to Bryant’s killing has turned into a debate about whether the use of force is justified is an attempt to “displace blame onto the victim and their family rather than on the systems that created situations that led to her death,” Bisetty, who has provided services in shelters, schools, and jails, wrote. “It is worth considering whether Bryant might have still been alive today if a mental health expert — or someone else trained in nonviolent deescalation — had responded to the call.”

It’s also worth considering whether the police officer would have fired shots if Bryant or the people involved in the altercation were white. There are countless examples of police peacefully apprehending white boys and men wielding weapons. Just last year police officers in Kenosha, Wisconsin, handed water bottles to and thanked 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse, a self-described militia member who carried an AR-15-style rifle during the unrest that followed the police shooting of Jacob Blake. Rittenhouse was allowed to leave the scene after fatally shooting two people and harming another, though the police had been informed that he was the shooter.

In other cases, white men have verbally threatened police officers and pointed weapons at them. In those situations, the police did not reach for their guns at all or ever use them. In 2019, 19-year-old Matthew Bernard who killed two women and a child led Virginia authorities, who tried to stop him with mace and a stun gun, on a naked chase before they eventually took him into custody.

White women, too, often get a softer side of law enforcement handling. Several white women who were part of the Capitol insurrection on January 6 could be seen on video being peacefully escorted down the steps of the Capitol building amid the chaos. In a tense July 2020 Detroit-area encounter, a white woman in a minivan pointed a gun at a Black mother while the Black woman’s 15-year-old daughter watched and screamed nearby. When the police arrived after six 911 calls, they ordered the white woman out of the van, put her on the ground, handcuffed her, and took her gun, according to the police.

Black women aren’t treated with the same patriarchal protections, however problematic, that are afforded to white women, Lindsey points out. The idea that Black women should be handled with care because they are women just doesn’t exist.

“We see an incredibly disparate treatment gap between what white women experience with police and what Black women experience with police,” she said.
You lose your protections as child when you are attempting to murder another human being. This shooting had **** all to do with race but that will not stop you from milking it, **** race vulture.
 

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True. Fat people should be allowed to kill anyone

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If Mah Kia was a white woman going at a black woman with a knife, would the shooting be justified then?

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Neo » 03 May 2021, 8:29 pm » wrote: You lose your protections as child when you are attempting to murder another human being.
You can post that lie over and over until you are blue in the, face, it will not change the fact of the matter regarding her rights under the Castle Doctrine. By which, the cop should have ensured he was not shooting a victim/dweller of the resident who was protecting herself under the Castle Doctrine. Same doctrine you'd be fine with a White teen using in this same scenario.

This shooting had **** all to do with race
It had everything to do with Race. Because if she was Becky the White girl, then:
Reardon would have approach the house with siren blaring ---which would have likely stopped all violence. Reardon would not have put his mask on before getting out. Reardon would not have got out his car and immediately started pointing his gun at unarmed White people. Reardon would have used verbal commands to de-escalate the fight. Reardon would have shot Becky in the much larger target [legs, buttocks] instead of shooting Becky in a much smaller [midsection] target, at an angle that even endangered Meghan who Becky was about to swing a knife at. Face this.
but that will not stop you from milking it
The truth should always be, milked, until it sets your satanic soul free.

vulture.
hey look here pal you'd better go light on your, mother, here in these discussion threads 
 
 
 

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Taipan » 03 May 2021, 8:09 pm » wrote: Blacks commit 80% of the crime in this country.
How do we know you're lying?  Your lips are moving.

Arrests by offense, age, and race

                    Offenses
All races.  10,085,210
White.         7,014,550
Black.          2,667,010        
 
 Statistics are from calendar year 2019.
 
Last edited by Ike Bana on 03 May 2021, 9:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Abatjour » 03 May 2021, 7:55 pm » wrote: Why they’re not saying Ma’Khia Bryant’s name: The 16-year-old Black girl could never be the “perfect victim.”

By Fabiola Cineas  May 1, 2021, 8:30am  
Image

A funeral service is held for 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant at the First Church of God on April 30, 2021 in Columbus, Ohio. Bryant was shot and killed on April 20 by a Columbus police officer answering a domestic dispute call.  

Scott Olson/Getty ImagesAfter watching 15 seconds of police body camera footage last week, viewers of various races and political affiliations had made a decision: 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant was “the aggressor” — the “fat,” “huge,” “knife-wielding attacker” and “maniac” who deserved to be fatally shot by the police on April 20 in Columbus,Ohio. According to these viewers, Nicholas Reardon, the police officer who immediately shot and killed Bryant, who was holding a knife, was justified.

That she was a teenager in the middle of an altercation, in which she was presumed to be defending herself, did not matter.Reardon shot Bryant dead about 20 minutes before a judge announced that a jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd, a killing that catalyzed worldwide protests against police violence. For a moment, those seeking justice for Black life exhaled in relief, knowing that the officer who callously took Floyd’s life would be imprisoned.

But the cries for justice that applied to George Floyd did not ring out as loudly for Bryant. Even after it was discovered that Bryant was living in foster care, that she was in the middle of a fight with older women when police arrived, and that she was allegedly the one who summoned the police for help, people — some of the same people who called for justice in Floyd’s case — used police talking points to justify the four bullets that Reardon unloaded into Bryant’s chest. She was brandishing a knife, many pointed out, which meant the other Black women needed to be protected. Crisis response experts noted, however, that deescalation tactics — like commanding Bryant to drop the weapon, physically getting between the women, or simply communicating with her — could have kept everyone alive. In many recorded encounters between the police and white people carrying weapons, for instance, officers didn’t shoot first or even reach for their guns — they successfully managed to peacefully apprehend the suspect.

Arm Chair Quarterbacks like you who have never even been in a fist fight  are pathetic and your opinions about situations like this are meaningless.

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IkeBana » 03 May 2021, 9:26 pm » wrote: How do we know you're lying?  Your lips are moving.

Arrests by offense, age, and race

                    Offenses
All races.  10,085,210
White.         7,014,550
Black.          2,667,010        
 
 Statistics are from calendar year 2019.

juveniles?

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IkeBana » 03 May 2021, 9:26 pm » wrote: How do we know you're lying?  Your lips are moving.

Arrests by offense, age, and race

                    Offenses
All races.  10,085,210
White.         7,014,550
Black.          2,667,010        
 
 Statistics are from calendar year 2019.
I think you will find that Browns are lumped in with Whites for that statistic.
Browns will usually come in somewhat less than Blacks, but Browns have a higher rate of crime than Whites.
 

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Blutarski » 04 May 2021, 12:58 am » wrote: I think you will find that Browns are lumped in with Whites for that statistic.
Browns will usually come in somewhat less than Blacks, but Browns have a higher rate of crime than Whites.

dude...it's juvenile crime. 

Browns are never arrested for juvenile crime.

It's a totally fake statistic. Check the source.

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FOS » 04 May 2021, 1:01 am » wrote: dude...it's juvenile crime. 

Browns are never arrested for juvenile crime.

It's a totally fake statistic. Check the source.

Look at the  Bureau of Justice chart those numbers came from....there is no category for Latino or Hispanic.

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Blutarski » 04 May 2021, 1:09 am » wrote: Look at the  Bureau of Justice chart those numbers came from....there is no category for Latino or Hispanic.
these aren't even real numbers. It is juvenile crime. Police only arrest juvenile whites who commit crime. Rarely blacks.
 

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IkeBana » 03 May 2021, 9:26 pm » wrote: How do we know you're lying?  Your lips are moving.

Arrests by offense, age, and race

                    Offenses
All races.  10,085,210
White.         7,014,550
Black.          2,667,010        
 
 Statistics are from calendar year 2019.

You failed to mention your source.
On purpose ??  
Maybe you got them from the Southern Poverty Law Center.    The White-hating, black-power group.
Next time try FBI/DOJ Stats.
You will learn that ****** commit about 10 times more crime(per capita) than any other race.

And please.............stop APPEASING violent, criminal, racist, ******.     It makes you look weak.

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Abatjour » 03 May 2021, 9:16 pm » wrote: You can post that lie over and over until you are blue in the, face, it will not change the fact of the matter regarding her rights under the Castle Doctrine. By which, the cop should have ensured he was not shooting a victim/dweller of the resident who was protecting herself under the Castle Doctrine. Same doctrine you'd be fine with a White teen using in this same scenario.

It had everything to do with Race. Because if she was Becky the White girl, then:
Reardon would have approach the house with siren blaring ---which would have likely stopped all violence. Reardon would not have put his mask on before getting out. Reardon would not have got out his car and immediately started pointing his gun at unarmed White people. Reardon would have used verbal commands to de-escalate the fight. Reardon would have shot Becky in the much larger target [legs, buttocks] instead of shooting Becky in a much smaller [midsection] target, at an angle that even endangered Meghan who Becky was about to swing a knife at. Face this.

The truth should always be, milked, until it sets your satanic soul free.

hey look here pal you'd better go light on your, mother, here in these discussion threads
Castle doctrine doesn't apply if you leave your Castle with a knife and try to murder an unarmed person with it.
 

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Abatjour » 03 May 2021, 7:55 pm » wrote: Why they’re not saying Ma’Khia Bryant’s name: The 16-year-old Black girl could never be the “perfect victim.”

By Fabiola Cineas  May 1, 2021, 8:30am  
Image

A funeral service is held for 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant at the First Church of God on April 30, 2021 in Columbus, Ohio. Bryant was shot and killed on April 20 by a Columbus police officer answering a domestic dispute call.  

Scott Olson/Getty ImagesAfter watching 15 seconds of police body camera footage last week, viewers of various races and political affiliations had made a decision: 16-year-old Ma’Khia Bryant was “the aggressor” — the “fat,” “huge,” “knife-wielding attacker” and “maniac” who deserved to be fatally shot by the police on April 20 in Columbus,Ohio. According to these viewers, Nicholas Reardon, the police officer who immediately shot and killed Bryant, who was holding a knife, was justified.

That she was a teenager in the middle of an altercation, in which she was presumed to be defending herself, did not matter.Reardon shot Bryant dead about 20 minutes before a judge announced that a jury found former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin guilty of murdering George Floyd, a killing that catalyzed worldwide protests against police violence. For a moment, those seeking justice for Black life exhaled in relief, knowing that the officer who callously took Floyd’s life would be imprisoned.

But the cries for justice that applied to George Floyd did not ring out as loudly for Bryant. Even after it was discovered that Bryant was living in foster care, that she was in the middle of a fight with older women when police arrived, and that she was allegedly the one who summoned the police for help, people — some of the same people who called for justice in Floyd’s case — used police talking points to justify the four bullets that Reardon unloaded into Bryant’s chest. She was brandishing a knife, many pointed out, which meant the other Black women needed to be protected. Crisis response experts noted, however, that deescalation tactics — like commanding Bryant to drop the weapon, physically getting between the women, or simply communicating with her — could have kept everyone alive. In many recorded encounters between the police and white people carrying weapons, for instance, officers didn’t shoot first or even reach for their guns — they successfully managed to peacefully apprehend the suspect.
 
 
When attempting to correct improper social behavior, the narrative is about improper social behavior and those performing it become self evident when performing the improper behavior.

Like insurance now a days, doesn't matter if you aren't at fault, you get equal blame for an accident and rates go up. Conquest of other peoples property or defending your own, both act the same way taking and defending.

Nobody is allowed to defend their life's efforts anymore and society controls outcomes of anyone occupying space from now on. Gee nobody knows what went wrong. deniers everywhere.

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omh » 04 May 2021, 7:06 am » wrote:  
Like insurance now a days, doesn't matter if you aren't at fault, you get equal blame for an accident and rates go up.  
ROFL

please stop ruining my thread themes with your, insanity, and go post it somewhere else where members enjoy reading you be incorrect about everything.

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